A spooky sample

This week on 7 o Clock sample I’ve decided to take a look at the music of French electronic duo… JUSTICE.

If you ran into Gaspard Augé  and Xavier de Rosnay on the subway, you may think they were in a retro metal band.  There look is not too far off from their music.  They often use progressive rock and metal samples to create their unique larger than life tracks.

Their debut album , alternatively known as Cross, released in June of 2007.  This album thrust Justice to the top of the international electronic scene.  Like Daft Punk, Chemical Brothers and the like, this dynamic duo have been selling out arenas and headlining some of the biggest music festivals.

They pull from a wide variety of sample sources, including funk, disco, rock and oddly enough, horror movie sound tracks.

Check out track 5 on CROSS.

Cool sounds huh?

Well check out the sample’s source…

CREEPY!

That’s the sounds of Italian progressive rock outfit GOBLIN.  Goblin are an Italian progressive rock band known for their soundtracks for Dario Argento films.  They had an brief and unsuccessful run  in the 70s as the Cherry Five.  They began to compose scores for horror films, and achieved a large cult following through these films.

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Hell Yes Dust Bros

This week on SEVEN O CLOCK Sample we are looking at the sampling legacy of the Dust Brothers.

EZ Mike and King Gizmo have an impressive resume, that includes working with the Beastie Boys, Young MC, Tone Loc, The Rolling Stones, Hanson, and Beck.

The fellas have worked with Beck numerous times. Beck had the Dust Brothers produce his album Odelay, released in 1996. The album spawned the hit songs “Where It’s At” , “Devils Haircut” , “The New Pollution” and “Jack-Ass”  They got into the studio together again in 2004 to produce Beck’s best charting album to date, Guero.

On Guero, Beck and the Dust Brothers pull together a lot of rare grooves and funky loops to build the back drop of the project.

One of my personal favorites is the track “HELL YES”

Great song, that samples another great song….

That’s the OHIO PLAYERS with “Far East Mississippi”

WOW!

The ( Super ) Dust Brothers

We always look to find interesting and unique samples here on the SEVEN O CLOCK SAMPLE, and today we are not only looking at quality, but QUANTITY.

In 1988 the Beastie Boys headed west to LA to produce their sophomore album PAUL’S BOTIQUE.  After leaving Def Jam and Rick Rubin, the Beasties were in search of a new sound.

They found it in west cost production team, THE DUST BROTHERS.

The Dust Brothers, E.Z. Mike (Michael Simpson) and King Gizmo (John King) revolutionized the way sampled tracks were created.  These two unlikely hip hop heroes set a new standard for how sampling hardware was used and how sample based music was created.  In college they had a Rap radio show, and after they became well known DJs, they began to produce.

There they produced and sequenced tracks on Tone Lōc’s album, Lōc-ed After Dark. They also produced two tracks on Young MC’s debut album Stone Cold Rhymin.

Shortly after that, they meet the Beastie Boys, and these 5 men together created a record-setting hip hop opus!

In total, 105 songs were sampled on the album, including 24 individual samples on the last track alone!  The timing of this album is what makes it so historic.  Just 2 years later, Biz Markie would be sued by Gilbert O’Sullivan in the Grand Upright Music, Ltd. v. Warner Bros. case.  After that case, sampling records like this would not be legal.  ( It would happen again, but not legally. )

This album has some great tracks, here is one of my favorites…

There are a dozen records sampled on this track; including Kool and The Gang, Public Enemy, Sly and The Famliy Stone, The Commodores, The JAWS Soundtrack, and of course; Curtis Mayfield’s SHAFT THEME.

Samples out of the Atmosphere

This week, Minnesota rap super group, ATMOSPHERE return to Milwaukee…

Slug and Ant are two of Hip Hop’s least likely superstars.

They hardly look the part of two international rap celebrities, and their music hardly follows the rules of Rap hit themes.

Ya know like, guns, inner city thugs, rims, clubs, women… Well maybe women!

In 2005, Ant and Slug released You Can’t Imagine How much fun We’re Having.  This album was filled with solid Atmosphere hits, including this track….

Get Fly was one of my personal favorites from this project, it’s sample comes from a rare gospel recording from the mid seventies.

Take a listen to Pastor Walter Hawkins on this beautiful soul gospel, ” I Love The Lord”

Great sample huh?

Much More Dilla

This morning we are continuing or exploration of J Dilla samples…

In the mid and later 200os, the entire rap world was buzzing about Dilla’s beat tapes.  As many producers often do, J Dilla would give out “tapes” of his beats for Emcees to preview and hopefully, buy.  In order to avoid his beats getting snatched up with out proper licence, Dilla found a number of creative ways to blend his neats together, and tag them with the infamous “JAY DILA!” exclamation.

These “tapes” began to circulate around the Hip Hop underground, and many rap fans were getting their hands on Dilla’s DONUTS, as they came to be known in the industry.  I was among these underground rap heads who were itching to get their hands on the Dilla tapes.

I had a few, and one beat that stuck out in my head was this one…

I’m not the only one who loved this beat… A few months later I heard this track.

This is one of my favorite De La tracks from this album, and that says a lot, because this album is fantastic!

So where did Dilla get this sample from?

In 1976, L.T.D. (which stands for Love, Togetherness, and Devotion), released LOVE TO THE WORLD on A&M records.  The album contained a number of great soul jams, including this cut…

Nice huh?

Dilla is LOVE

Last week a listener asked me to explore some J Dilla beats on the SEVEN O CLOCK SAMPLE, so I said…

Ok, let’s TURN IT UP!

DIlla passed away in 2006, after a long battle with Lupus.  Many knew Jay Dee was sick, but few saw his death coming.

When he passed, the Hip Hop world came to a halt.  Folks from every corner of the globe stopped to pay tribute to the genres most influential, and under credited producer.  Still to this day, J Dilla tribute mixtapes, albums, shirts and images pop up on the regular.

In addition to his work with Slum Village and The Soulquarians, Dilla produced some of my favorite Hip Hop tracks. In 2004, he worked with fellow Solquarian COMMON, on his Kanye West produced come back album BE.  Common’s previous album Electric Circus, which also featured Dilla, was a commercial flop.  Common was ready to start again, he left MCA and released a new and fresh sounding album on Kanye’s GOOD MUSIC label.  J Dilla was the only producer, besides Kanye, to contribute a beat on this album, and I must say, it’s one of the best….

This beautiful beat can be found on one of Dillas mid 2000s beat tapes, which became known in the industry as donuts.

Here is what the beat sounded like before Common got it…

The sample that Dilla dug up for this track is a Marvin Gaye 45, that was released in 1970 on Tamla.

(listen closely at 1:19 )

MARVIN GAYE and J DILLA… A match made in heaven.

R.I.P Fellas.

Grandmaster Flash and the Spectacular Samples

This week on 7 o clock sample, we are looking at hip hop pioneers GRANDMASTER FLASH and the FURIOUS FIVE.

In the late 1970s, the idea of recording Rap music was an odd concept.  Hip Hop culture developed from the “have-nots” of our society, so the high price of recording a track, was not an option.  Even when rap labels and managers came on the scene, the process of recording Hip Hop was not the same as the performance.

Take Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five for example.  Melle Mel, Kidd Creole, Cowboy, Mr. Ness/Scorpio, and Rahiem were the hype men for the DJ.  They acted as the link between the record the Flash was playing, and the dancers on the floor.  As the fellas began to develop “raps” over certain breaks, the Hip Hop SONGS were born.  These songs would be different every time you would see them performed, and often, they were not perfect.  A record could skip, or the loop may not completely come together, changing the dynamic of the song.

When SUGAR HILL RECORDS signed GMF and the FF, they were in the practice of recording Hip Hop tracks with live studio bands.   The early Hip Hop hits of the late 70s and early 80s were mostly recreated samples, played by studio musicians.

So while today’s example may not be a true SAMPLE, it stemmed from the records that Grandmaster Flash was sampling in the live shows.

Here is the original record that Flash would loop for at the break….

Funk jam!

Here is how the Sugar Hill band and the Furious Five recorded the track…